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12 Principles of Animation
1 - Squash and Stretch
2 - Anticipation
3 - Staging
4 - Straight Ahead & Pose to Pose
5 - Follow Through & Overlapping Action
6 - Slow-In & Slow-Out
7 - Arcs
8 - Secondary Action
9 - Timing
10 - Exaggeration
11 - Solid Drawing
12 - Appeal
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Animation Solid Drawing

11. Solid Drawing

Animation Solid Drawing

The principle of solid drawing means taking into account forms in three-dimensional space, giving them volume and weight. The traditional animators needed to be a skilled draftsman and have an understanding of the basics of three-dimensional shapes, anatomy, weight, balance, light and shadow etc. For the classical animator, this involved taking art classes and doing sketches from life. One thing in particular that Johnston and Thomas (2 of the founders of the 12 principles of animation) warned against was creating "twins": characters whose left and right sides mirrored each other, and looked lifeless. Modern-day computer animators draw less because of the facilities computers give them, yet their work benefits greatly from a basic understanding of animation principles, and their additions to basic computer animation.