Home > Principles of Animation
Article Index
12 Principles of Animation
1 - Squash and Stretch
2 - Anticipation
3 - Staging
4 - Straight Ahead & Pose to Pose
5 - Follow Through & Overlapping Action
6 - Slow-In & Slow-Out
7 - Arcs
8 - Secondary Action
9 - Timing
10 - Exaggeration
11 - Solid Drawing
12 - Appeal
All Pages

9. Timing

Animation TimingGood timing really comes with good experience and experimentation, using the trial and error method in refining your technique. The basics are: more drawings between poses slow and smooth the action. Fewer drawings make the action faster and crisper. This translates over to 3d applications as well, the more keyframes you have the more variety of movement you can have, and the more you can adjust for timing. A variety of both slow and fast timing within a scene adds texture and interest to the movement. Most animation is done on twos (one drawing photographed on two frames of film) or on ones (one drawing photographed on each frame of film).Animation Timing Twos are used most of the time, and ones are used during camera moves such as trucks, pans and occasionally for subtle and quick dialogue animation. Also, there is timing in the acting of a character to establish mood, emotion, and reaction to another character or to a situation. Studying movement of actors and performers on stage and in films is useful when animating human or animal characters. This frame by frame examination of film footage will aid you in understanding timing for animation. This is a great way to learn from the others.